Images/Movies
Images and movies that demonstrate the state of the art in solar radio imaging.

Nobeyama Radioheliograph Movie
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Nobeyama Radioheliograph (17 GHz) Movie
This GIF movie well demonstrates the excellent imaging that is possible with large interferometer arrays designed specifically for the Sun.  Click on the animation or the "caption" link for more information about the animation.
Flare Movie
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Nobeyama Radioheliograph Flare Movie
This GIF movie shows the development of a long-duration flare in total intensity on the left, and in circular polarization on the right.  Click on the image at the left to start the GIF movie (900 kb), or select the "caption" link for more information about the animation.
Flare Observed with VLA
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Very Large Array (VLA) Flare Movie
This GIF movie shows another long-duration flare (contours) observed at the Very Large Array radiotelescope and superimposed on Ha images taken with a high-speed camera.  This view from above allows us to watch the development of magnetic loops filled with energetic electrons.  Click on the image at the left to start the GIF movie (760 kb), or select the "caption" link for more information about the animation.
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Nobeyama Radioheliograph Erupting Prominence Movie
This GIF movie shows a very large prominence protruding from the solar limb that erupts rather spectacularly.  Such eruptions and their associated coronal mass ejections, when directed at the Earth, can cause magnetic storms and other problems.  The radio disk of the Sun has been subtracted away, so that we see only the arc of the solar limb along the left edge of the frame, and the erupting prominence heading toward the right.  Click on the image at the left to start the GIF movie (910 kb), or select the "caption" link for more information about the animation.
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Nobeyama Radioheliograph Flare Ejecta Movie
This GIF movie looks similar to the one above, but this is quite different from a prominence eruption.  Instead, this movie shows a flare-related plasmoid shooting up into an existing loop, and shortly after the loop erupts.  The solar disk is seen along the right edge of the frame. Click on the image at the left to start the GIF movie (474 kb), or select the "caption" link for more information about the animation.

Last Updated: 10 Feb 1999  by Dale E. Gary dgary@njit.edu