Difference between revisions of "Polarization Mixing Correction (Old)"

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(Explanation of Polarization Mixing)
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= Explanation of Polarization Mixing =
 
= Explanation of Polarization Mixing =
The newer 2.1-m antennas [Ants 1-8 and 12] have AzEl (azimuth-elevation) mounts (also referred to as AltAz, where Altitude and Elevation are used synonymously), which means that their crossed linear feeds have a constant angle relative to the horizon (the axis of rotation being at the zenith).  The older 2.1-m antennas [Ants 9-11 and 13], and the 27-m antenna [Ant 14], have Equatorial mounts, which means that their crossed linear feeds have a constant angle with respect to the celestial equator, the axis of rotation being at the north celestial pole.  Thus, the celestial coordinate system is tilted by the local co-latitude (complement of the latitude).  This tilt results in a relative feed rotation between the 27-m antenna and the AzEl mounts, but not between the 27-m and the older equatorial mounts.  This angle is called the "parallactic angle," and is given by:
+
The newer 2.1-m antennas [Ants 1-8 and 12] have AzEl (azimuth-elevation) mounts (also referred to as AltAz; the terms Altitude and Elevation are used synonymously), which means that their crossed linear feeds have a constant angle relative to the horizon (the axis of rotation being at the zenith).  The older 2.1-m antennas [Ants 9-11 and 13], and the 27-m antenna [Ant 14], have Equatorial mounts, which means that their crossed linear feeds have a constant angle with respect to the celestial equator, the axis of rotation being at the north celestial pole.  Thus, the celestial coordinate system is tilted by the local co-latitude (complement of the latitude).  This tilt results in a relative feed rotation between the 27-m antenna and the AzEl mounts, but not between the 27-m and the older equatorial mounts.  This angle is called the "parallactic angle," and is given by:
  
 
<center><math>\chi = \arctan(\cos\lambda \sin A, \sin\lambda \cos E - \cos\lambda \sin E \cos A)</math>,</center>
 
<center><math>\chi = \arctan(\cos\lambda \sin A, \sin\lambda \cos E - \cos\lambda \sin E \cos A)</math>,</center>
  
where <math>\lambda</math> is the site latitude, <math>A</math> is the Azimuth angle [0 north], and <math>E</math> is the Elevation angle [0 on horizon].  This function obviously changes with position on the sky, and as we follow a celestial source (e.g. the Sun) across the sky this rotation angle is continuously changing in a surprisingly complex manner.
+
where <math>\lambda</math> is the site latitude, <math>A</math> is the Azimuth angle [0 north], and <math>E</math> is the Elevation angle [0 on horizon].  This function obviously changes with position on the sky, and as we follow a celestial source (e.g. the Sun) across the sky this rotation angle is continuously changing in a surprisingly complex manner.  Note that <math>\chi=0</math> at zero hour angle for declinations less than the local latitude (37.233 degrees at OVRO), but is <math>\pm \pi</math> at higher declinations.
  
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The crossed linear dipole feeds on all antennas
  
 
= Status of tests =
 
= Status of tests =

Revision as of 10:08, 21 October 2016

Fig. 1: Parallactic angle for a range of hour angle and declination. There is a large deviation for sources whose Dec = latitude (37 degrees), when they pass directly overhead.

Explanation of Polarization Mixing

The newer 2.1-m antennas [Ants 1-8 and 12] have AzEl (azimuth-elevation) mounts (also referred to as AltAz; the terms Altitude and Elevation are used synonymously), which means that their crossed linear feeds have a constant angle relative to the horizon (the axis of rotation being at the zenith). The older 2.1-m antennas [Ants 9-11 and 13], and the 27-m antenna [Ant 14], have Equatorial mounts, which means that their crossed linear feeds have a constant angle with respect to the celestial equator, the axis of rotation being at the north celestial pole. Thus, the celestial coordinate system is tilted by the local co-latitude (complement of the latitude). This tilt results in a relative feed rotation between the 27-m antenna and the AzEl mounts, but not between the 27-m and the older equatorial mounts. This angle is called the "parallactic angle," and is given by:

,

where is the site latitude, is the Azimuth angle [0 north], and is the Elevation angle [0 on horizon]. This function obviously changes with position on the sky, and as we follow a celestial source (e.g. the Sun) across the sky this rotation angle is continuously changing in a surprisingly complex manner. Note that at zero hour angle for declinations less than the local latitude (37.233 degrees at OVRO), but is at higher declinations.

The crossed linear dipole feeds on all antennas

Status of tests