Difference between revisions of "Polarization Mixing Correction (Old)"

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where <math>\lambda</math> is the site latitude, <math>A</math> is the Azimuth angle [0 north], and <math>E</math> is the Elevation angle [0 on horizon].  This function obviously changes with position on the sky, and as we follow a celestial source (e.g. the Sun) across the sky this rotation angle is continuously changing in a surprisingly complex manner.  Note that <math>\chi=0</math> at zero hour angle for declinations less than the local latitude (37.233 degrees at OVRO), but is <math>\pm \pi</math> at higher declinations.
 
where <math>\lambda</math> is the site latitude, <math>A</math> is the Azimuth angle [0 north], and <math>E</math> is the Elevation angle [0 on horizon].  This function obviously changes with position on the sky, and as we follow a celestial source (e.g. the Sun) across the sky this rotation angle is continuously changing in a surprisingly complex manner.  Note that <math>\chi=0</math> at zero hour angle for declinations less than the local latitude (37.233 degrees at OVRO), but is <math>\pm \pi</math> at higher declinations.
  
[[File:Feed_diagram.PNG|thumb|400px|Fig. 2: Illustration of 2.1-m feed package, and rotation of feed orientation by parallactic angle <math>\chi</math>.  Note that the feeds are oriented at 45-degrees from the horizontal at 0 hour angle, with X (= H) shown in yellow, and Y (=V) shown in blue. The 27-m horn feeds]]
+
[[File:Feed_diagram.PNG|thumb|400px|Fig. 2: Illustration of 27-m feed horns (left), 2.1-m feed package (middle), and rotation of feed orientation by parallactic angle <math>\chi</math> (right).  Note that the feeds are all oriented at 45-degrees from the horizontal at 0 hour angle, with X (= H) shown in yellow, and Y (=V) shown in blue.]]
  
 
The crossed linear dipole feeds on all antennas
 
The crossed linear dipole feeds on all antennas
  
 
= Status of tests =
 
= Status of tests =

Revision as of 10:30, 21 October 2016

Fig. 1: Parallactic angle for a range of hour angle and declination. There is a large deviation for sources whose Dec = latitude (37 degrees), when they pass directly overhead.

Explanation of Polarization Mixing

The newer 2.1-m antennas [Ants 1-8 and 12] have AzEl (azimuth-elevation) mounts (also referred to as AltAz; the terms Altitude and Elevation are used synonymously), which means that their crossed linear feeds have a constant angle relative to the horizon (the axis of rotation being at the zenith). The older 2.1-m antennas [Ants 9-11 and 13], and the 27-m antenna [Ant 14], have Equatorial mounts, which means that their crossed linear feeds have a constant angle with respect to the celestial equator, the axis of rotation being at the north celestial pole. Thus, the celestial coordinate system is tilted by the local co-latitude (complement of the latitude). This tilt results in a relative feed rotation between the 27-m antenna and the AzEl mounts, but not between the 27-m and the older equatorial mounts. This angle is called the "parallactic angle," and is given by:

,

where is the site latitude, is the Azimuth angle [0 north], and is the Elevation angle [0 on horizon]. This function obviously changes with position on the sky, and as we follow a celestial source (e.g. the Sun) across the sky this rotation angle is continuously changing in a surprisingly complex manner. Note that at zero hour angle for declinations less than the local latitude (37.233 degrees at OVRO), but is at higher declinations.

Fig. 2: Illustration of 27-m feed horns (left), 2.1-m feed package (middle), and rotation of feed orientation by parallactic angle (right). Note that the feeds are all oriented at 45-degrees from the horizontal at 0 hour angle, with X (= H) shown in yellow, and Y (=V) shown in blue.

The crossed linear dipole feeds on all antennas

Status of tests